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Australian impressionist works open in London

The National Gallery in London offers to escape from the dark cold winter to the landscapes of the Australian impressionists full of light and sun. The exhibition of the same name is the first exhibition of this kind in the vastness of Albion. She explores the views on Impressionism of four innovators from the Green Continent who lived in France in the late XIX and early XX centuries - Tom Roberts, Arthur Streeton, Charles Conder and John Russell / They were closely associated with their European counterparts, but at the same time completely different from them.Claude Monet introduced John Russell with his painting technique. Russell was friends with Van Gogh and introduced Matisse to impressionism. Charles Conder created the work by visiting the cabaret of Montmartre with Henri Toulouse-Lautrec ... Did the Australian artists manage to convey their original world view?Weekend in MentoneCharles Conder1888, 46.2 × 60.8 cm "It can be argued that the Australians coped with the plein-air painting challenges better than the British," write the curators of the exhibition "Australian Impressionists."Brooke Street Roberts 1886, 51.2 × 76.7 cm

The peak of the influence of the first key style of contemporary art came in the 1880s - 1890s. But, needless to say, the protagonists of this fascinating action studied or lived in Europe, and not at the other end of the Earth.
Many of the 41st works in the exhibition have never before been exhibited in the UK. Among them there are several masterpieces that give a clear and original “Australian answer” to impressionistic tendencies.
Left: Arthur Streeton, Blue Pacific (1890), fragment. See the full version of the picture here.

Tom Roberts (1856–1931), Arthur Streeton (1867–1943), Charles Conder (1868–1909), and John Russell (1858–1930) were key figures who contributed to the formation of a sense of identity in an entire continent. You probably know a lot about impressionism: you will call the names of leading artists, and you will easily find a hall in the museum where the water surface flickers and the same motif is written at different times of the day, and you will remember about the scandal at the first exhibition and even Monet from Mane distinguish. So, it's time to move on to the next level: everything else you wanted to learn about impressionism. Read further was a new word in Australian art, and four artists who adopted this style from France unfolded it in full light in the Southern Hemisphere.
The exhibition in London presents a spectrum from “instant sketches” of the vibrant cities of Melbourne and Sydney to dazzling images of the coast and shrub-covered spaces (in Australia they are called “bushlands”). Roberts, Streeton and Conder’s paintings embody a growing sense of national identity with which Australia approached the Federation in 1901.Golden Summer, EaglemontArthur Ernest Streeton 1889, 81.3 × 152.6 cm In contrast to the three artists already mentioned, John Russell was an Australian immigrant. He was the son of a Scottish engineer who came to Australia when John was still a child. Inheriting a large state after the death of his father, Russell decided to become an artist. After studying for seven years in London, Russell goes to Paris and attends the school of Fernand Cormon. There he met and became friends with Van Gogh. And Claude Monet personally acquainted John Russell with his unusual technique.
In general, there are plenty of intersections with famous personalities in the biography of this Australian: his first wife was a beautiful Italian model of Auguste Rodin. The family acquired a manor in Brittany, on the island of Belle-Ile. There, Russell visited Henri Matisse, and it was Russell who introduced him to impressionistic painting, to the works of the then little-known Vincent Van Gogh. Van Gogh also highly appreciated his fellow in the workshop: he even sent Russell to evaluate his 12 works made during the first summer season in Arles. A portrait of Van Gogh Russell brush, created in 1886, is stored in the Amsterdam Museum of the genius - neo-impressionist.AntibesJohn Peter Russell 1891, 16.5 × 24 cm Like his colleagues in Australia, Russell wrote under the open sky to capture the fleeting play of light on the landscape, but he went deeper into experiments using color. Here, young Henri Matisse had an undoubted influence on him. Many canvases, some of which were borrowed from the leading museums of Australia and private collectors, have not yet been exhibited in the UK. The exposition “Australian Impressionists” invites visitors to understand that you probably know a lot about impressionism: you will call the names of leading artists, and you will easily find a hall in the museum where the water surface flickers and the same motif is written at different times of the day, and The scandal at the first exhibition is sure to remember, and even Monet is different from Mane. So, it's time to move on to the next level: everything else you wanted to learn about impressionism. Read further at one time was perceived as an international phenomenon, which was transformed during his journey around the world.Escape Roberts 1891, 137.3 × 167.8 cmBiographies of the artists Streeton and Roberts crossed in 1886. Tom Roberts, having met Streeton, invites him to join the group of artists who later formed the basis of the so-called. "Heidelberg School of Painting": colleagues worked in the open air near Heidelberg (English Heidelberg), a suburb of Melbourne. The exhibition is accompanied by a colorful catalog that questions the prevailing stereotypes about impressionism, enriches the concept of "Australian art" and demonstrates the international character of this artistic and historical movement XIX century.Ariadne 1895 Arthur Ernest Streeton 1895, 12.7 × 35.4 cm. The exhibition “Australian Impressionists” at the National Gallery in London will open on December 7 and will last until March 26, 2017. According to materials from the National Gallery in London and artfund.org