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Poetry of modernity and more. Creativity Florina Stettheimer presented in New York

The Jewish Museum in New York presented to the public the first in 20 years, a large retrospective of Florina Stettheimer (1871−1944). This name is a real discovery for connoisseurs of art, and the artist’s biography deserves an adaptation. The influence of Art Nouveau and Art Deco is only touches to the portrait of the one whose dollhouse helped Marcel Duchamp, George Bellows and Alexander Archipenko to draw. The exhibition "Florin Stettheimer: drawing poetry" - more than 50 paintings and drawings, as well as costumes and theater projects, photographs and video installations.The exhibition presents the works of Florina Stettheimer in the context of the social and intellectual environment of New York in the early twentieth century. The viewer will be able to explore the unique art style of Stettheimer and its role in the interrelationships of the creative unions of New York.Self-portrait with a palette (Artist and Fawn) by Florin Stettheimer The dekorativny and imaginative style of the artist's work, influenced by modern and art-deco, critics call "feminine", considering it as a kind of alternative to more graphic modernist painting. We find in her works and echoes of the creativity of Georgia O'Keefe, with whom the artist was friends, we recall Renoir, Sargent, Erte, Chagall ... Maybe, as an artist, Stettheimer is not too original, but its various works have a special charm that is more pronounced on the background her biography. Life as a performance ... So they say today.Family portrait No. 1 of Florin Stettheimer 1915, 10.2 × 15.8 cm The woman was born into a rich Jewish-German family in Rochester (New York), but she graduated from elementary school in Germany. After the divorce of the parents, Florin, along with two sisters, remained to live with her mother, two more children had by that time established their families and lived separately. The father of the family, the banker Josef Stettheimer, left his former wife Rosette a decent state, which enabled her not to think about money and lead an Epicurean lifestyle. The sisters in their teens and adolescents received a good upbringing, they had governess and tutors, the girls attended art museums and theaters in all European capitals.Family portrait №2 of Florin Stettheimer1933

Florina, and Etty (Henrietta) decided to get a liberal arts education, and their older sister, Carrie, devoted herself to housekeeping, taking care of her mother and sisters.
Affection for mothers and women’s education caused all three sisters to never marry. Their solid "family matriarchy" preached a life based on pleasures and emotional equanimity.

Model (Self-portrait nude) by Florin Stettheimer 1915 "Sometimes Stettheimer is presented as a frivolous female artist with a penchant for quirks," notes Stephen Brown, assistant curator of the Neubauer family foundation (Jewish Museum). “This point of view is refuted by its powerful vision of the portrait and its insightful adaptation of European avant-garde ideas, primarily symbolism, to unique American images.”Self-portrait with the birds of paradise Florin Stettheimer 10 × 8.1 cmAt the exhibition of Florina Stettheimer in the Jewish Museum of New York.
Photo source: thejewishmuseum.org. Photographer: Jason Mandella Having decided to become an artist, Florina Stettheimer began her education at the Art Students League in New York. Her teachers were Kenyon Cox, a typical representative of academic painting, as well as Robert Henri, an opponent of academic art and one of the founders of the “Trash Bin School” (Ashcan School). Continuing her studies in Europe, Stettheimer came under the influence of Symbolist artists, and also fell in love with Russian ballet.At the exhibition of Florina Stettheimer in the Jewish Museum of New York.
Photo source: thejewishmuseum.org. Photographer: Jason Mandella The First World War forced the Stettheimer family to return from Germany to New York, and this was a turning point in Florina’s work. Her first solo exhibition was held in New York in 1916, at the Gallery Knodler & Company (Knoedler & Company). Of the 12 paintings presented, not one was sold, and more than Stettheimer did not arrange personal exhibitions during her lifetime.
  • Florina Worththaymer. Portrait Portrait is a realistic genre depicting a person or a group of people existing in reality. The portrait - in the French reading - portrait, from the old French portraire - "reproduce something line in line." Another facet of the name of the portrait lies in the outdated word "parsuna" - from the Latin. persona - "person; person". Read on to my mother. 1925
  • Florina Worththaymer. Portrait Portrait is a realistic genre depicting a person or a group of people existing in reality. The portrait - in the French reading - portrait, from the old French portraire - "reproduce something line in line." Another facet of the name of the portrait lies in the outdated word "parsuna" - from the Latin. persona - "person; person". Read on to my aunt Caroline Walter Neustadter. 1928
The sisters and their mother developed their plan for the presentation of Florina’s paintings: parties! A year earlier, they opened their own salon in Manhattan, which was created "for the modernists, modern writers and polyglots of New York, as well as European expatriates." The salon of the Stettheimer family attracted many of the leading avant-garde art fans, including Florina’s close friend Marcel Duchamp, as well as Alfred Stiegitz, Carl van Vechten, Georgia O'Keeffe, Eli Nadelman, Gaston Lashez and many others.Portrait of Marcel Duchamp Florin Stettheimer 1925Asbury Park South Florin Stettheimer 1920

The fact that Florina Stettheimer writes poetry, knew only a few of her friends, and, of course, the family.
Curious, funny, festive, always sharp, Florina's poetry touches on topics such as likes and dislikes, nature and food, people and their moods. Many poems are devoted, for example, to Marcel Duchamp, whom Florin affectionately calls Duce, or Gertrude Stein, who was Gertie for her. Seven poems of the artist placed on the walls of the gallery, complementing the exhibition of paintings and drawings. Note that after the artist’s death, her sister Etty collected Florina’s poems and published the book “Crystal Flowers” ​​in a modest circulation of 250 copies. In 2010, the book was reprinted and supplemented with materials about the artist.
Florina Stettheimer in the garden of Bryant Park in Manhattan. 1917−1920 Photo from the collection of Columbia University

Florina Stettheimer. Spring sale at Bendel's. 1921HeatFlorin Stettheimer1919
  • At the exhibition of Florina Stettheimer in the Jewish Museum of New York.
  • Photo source: thejewishmuseum.org. Photographer: Jason Mandella
Theater and ballet also meant a lot to Florina Stettheimer. In the summer of 1912, in Paris, she attended the presentation of the ballet by Claude Debussy “Afternoon Rest of the Faun” staged by the “Russian Ballets”. The artist, who was 40 years old at the time, was inspired to create her own ballet. From the autumn of 1912 to 1916, she conceived the libretto and drew, painted, sketched costumes for her staging Orpheus of the Four Arts. The exhibition presents many of the sketches, layouts and sculptures for the ballet, which never saw the light of day. The libretto of the ballet was published in 2010 in the reprinted book of verses by Stettheimer “Crystal Flowers”.Christmas Florin Stettheimer 1930The exhibition also features more than a dozen costumes and scenery by Florina Stettheimer for the innovative opera by Virgil Thomson (music) and Gertrude Stein (libretto) "The Four Saints in Three Acts" (1934) (pictured above). Instead of drawing sketches, the artist created the design in three dimensions, using handmade figures and miniature models of the scene. Opera set on Broadway; She has used a variety of unusual materials for her, including cellophane, feathers, glitter and corals. The exhibition presents rare footage shot by renowned avant-garde art dealer Julien Levy at the dress rehearsal of the opera in 1934.Scene from Act I of the composer V. Thomson's “Four Saints in Three Acts”. Scenography and costumes by Florina Stettheimer. Photo from the collection of Columbia University (not represented at the exhibition).

Despite the fact that this exhibit is not present at the New York exhibition, I would like to mention one more artistic value of the Statetheimer family, namely, the dollhouse.
The idea of ​​creating a two-story, with twelve rooms and office premises of the doll house, belongs to Florina's elder sister, Kerry, who initially in the family assumed the responsibilities of a housewife, providing life and comfort for the mother and sisters.
The exhibition's curator, John Noble, installs figurines of dolls at the Stettheimer Dollhouse. 1970s Museum of the city of New York.

In 1916, during summer vacations in upstate New York, the sisters and other vacationers took part in a charity fair to raise funds for the local children affected by the polio epidemic. Carrie, together with Florina and Etty, created a dollhouse from wooden boxes taken from a local grocer, decorating it with furniture from the found parts and specially created interior objects. When the family returned home to New York, Carrie decided to create her own dollhouse, in which "obviously some aristocratic family should" live.
  • Doll House Stettheimer
The house was created from 1916 to 1935. Florina created the facade of the building, made sketches for the design of the rooms, and took over the design of the rooms as “works of art”, since the house even had its own art gallery. She asked her friends to saddle tiny copies of her work for her.
So in the gallery of the dollhouse appeared the sculpture of Marcel Duchamp "Nude", the works of Alexander Archipenko and Gaston Lachaise, George Wesley Bellouza and Margarita Zorash. In 1945, Carrie Statethimer, who survived her sister, presented this dollhouse to the Museum of the City of New York.Detail of the interior of the art gallery at the Stettheimer Dollhouse. Museum of the City of New YorkExhibition "Florin Stettheimer: Pictorial Poetry" at the Jewish Museum in New York
open until September 24, 2017. Then the exhibition will move to Toronto, where it will work from October 21, 2017 to January 28, 2018. Arthiv: read us at Telegraf and look on Instagram.
Based on artdaily.com, thejewishmuseum.org, parashutov.livejournal.com. Illustrations: The Jewish Museum in New York.
Title illustration: Florina Stettheimer, “Family Portrait A portrait is a realistic genre depicting a person or a group of people. The portrait - in the French reading - portrait, from the old French portraire - "reproduce something line in line." Another facet of the name of the portrait lies in the outdated word "parsuna" - from the Latin. persona - "person; person". Read more № 2. 1933